1952 Graduation Announcement of Tidewater Area Students, University of Virginia

John Davis Norfleet of Hickory, Virginia graduated in 1952 from the University of Virginia with a Bachelor of Arts degree. Memory informs me that it was a general study of law, but that is unconfirmed.

From the local regional newspaper, probably the Virginia Pilot.

May 1952 - local Tidewater announcement of UVA graduates, to include John Norfleet of Hickory, Virginia
May 1952 - local Tidewater announcement of UVA graduates, to include John Norfleet of Hickory, Virginia
1941 Graduation notice of John D Norfleet
1941 Graduation notice of John D Norfleet
1941 Graduation card of John D Norfleet
1941 Graduation card of John D Norfleet
1937 graduation certificate of John Norfleet
1937 Elementary School Graduation Certificate of John Norfleet

Am a family historian of the Norfleet family (came to America in 1636/37 at Jamestown from Norfleet, England) and the Richard Golden family (came to America at Savannah, Georgia by way of Ireland). I welcome your photos, stories and memories. If you have no one to leave them to the please consider sending them to me. I promise to keep them safe, to digitize them, and to share them with the world. You can reach me at BillG@GWorx.com

John D. Norfleet – At the far end of Pearl Harbor, On V-J Day

Like most American families, there were numerous of my relatives that served in the U.S. Armed Services during World War II.

One of them was my great uncle John Davis Norfleet of Hickory (Chesapeake), Virginia.

John Norfleet was a Navy storekeeper (logistics & supply) that learned the trade at a school hastily setup in a hotel in Boston, Massachusetts and then he shipped out to Attu in the Aleutian Islands where he finished out the war.

Graduation Certificate for Storekeeper School 1944 0703 - John Davis Norfleet
1944 July 3rd U.S. Navy Graduation Certificate for Storekeeper School - John Davis Norfleet
We will hold Attu till Hell freezes over
A document or envelop stamp honoring military service (and sacrifice) on Attu, Aleutian Islands.
John Norfleet with mates on V-J Day on Attu - Aug 14th 1945
John Norfleet, U.S. Navy with mates on V-J Day on Attu - Aug 14th 1945
John Norfleet with mates on V-J Day on Attu - Aug 14th 1945  (backside of foto)
John Norfleet with mates and his 'Skipper' on V-J Day on Attu - Aug 14th 1945 (backside of foto)
Stamp honoring Aleutian Island service
A U.S. Navy document or envelop stamp honoring Aleutian Island service
John Norfleet, with shipmates, is in bottom lefthand corner with a pipe
John Norfleet, with shipmates, is in bottom lefthand photo corner with a pipe
John D. Norfleet military driver license
John D. Norfleet's U.S. Navy military driver license
1944 12 Christmas Party at Attu
1944 Christmas Party at Attu, U.S. Navy
Official 1944 Christmas photo of Attu to send home to family
Official 1944 Christmas photo of Attu to send home to family
Attu landscape - a mountain and a glacier
Attu landscape - a mountain and a glacier

 

Postscript:  After the war John Norfleet returned home for a short while and then went the University of Virginia, graduating in 1952 with a degree in law. He died in 1985 at Hickory, Virginia.


Am a family historian of the Norfleet family (came to America in 1636/37 at Jamestown from Norfleet, England) and the Richard Golden family (came to America at Savannah, Georgia by way of Ireland). I welcome your photos, stories and memories. If you have no one to leave them to the please consider sending them to me. I promise to keep them safe, to digitize them, and to share them with the world. You can reach me at BillG@GWorx.com

Marion Norfleet Styron – U.S. Army 1944

Marion Norfleet Styron of Hickory, Virginia was my great aunt on my mother’s side. She married Donald Styron. Both served in the U.S. Army and met during World War II.

Aunt Marion joined the Women Army Corps (WAC) when she got the chance.

These photos are from December 1944 while she was in the Chattanooga, Tennessee area. She sent these photos to my Uncle John Norfleet, U.S. Navy, who was himself stationed at Attu in the Aleutians at the time.

Note: click the photos to get larger, higher resolution versions. Two levels are provided.

FYI – The Norfleets are among Virginia’s and America’s oldest families, having arrived at Jamestown, Virginia no later than October 1637 when they received a land grant at what is now the Springfield Plantation on the James River, Virginia.


Am a family historian of the Norfleet family (came to America in 1636/37 at Jamestown from Norfleet, England) and the Richard Golden family (came to America at Savannah, Georgia by way of Ireland). I welcome your photos, stories and memories. If you have no one to leave them to the please consider sending them to me. I promise to keep them safe, to digitize them, and to share them with the world. You can reach me at BillG@GWorx.com

Insults as art, and no shortage of sarcasm

Modern insults can be so crass and in your face. Cheap insults are so common that they are as predictable as a country song.

For those that yearn for the good ol’days when insults were well thought out and full of sarcasm, my friend Bill Case offers the following classics:

  • A member of Parliament to Disraeli: “Sir, you will either die on the gallows or of some unspeakable disease.” “That depends, Sir,” said Disraeli, “whether I embrace your policies or your mistress.”
  • “He had delusions of adequacy.” – Walter Kerr
  • “He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire.” – Winston Churchill
  • “I have never killed a man, but I have read many obituaries with great pleasure.” Clarence Darrow
  • “He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.” – William Faulkner (about Ernest Hemingway).
  • “Thank you for sending me a copy of your book; I’ll waste no time reading it.” – Moses Hadas
  • “I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.” – Mark Twain
  • “He has no enemies, but is intensely disliked by his friends..” – Oscar Wilde
  • “I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend, if you have one.” – George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill … “Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second … if there is one.” – Winston Churchill, in response.
  • “I feel so miserable without you; it’s almost like having you here.” – Stephen Bishop
  • “He is a self-made man and worships his creator.” – John Bright
  • “I’ve just learned about his illness. Let’s hope it’s nothing trivial.” – Irvin S. Cobb
  • “He is not only dull himself; he is the cause of dullness in others.” – Samuel Johnson
  • “He is simply a shiver looking for a spine to run up.” – Paul Keating
  • “In order to avoid being called a flirt, she always yielded easily.” – Charles, Count Talleyrand
  • “He loves nature in spite of what it did to him.” – Forrest Tucker
  • “Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without any address on it?” – Mark Twain
  • “His mother should have thrown him away and kept the stork.” – Mae West
  • “Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.” – Oscar Wilde
  • “He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts… for support rather than illumination.” – Andrew Lang (1844-1912)
  • “He has Van Gogh’s ear for music.” – Billy Wilder
  • “I’ve had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn’t it.” – Groucho Marx